Putting In Your Time and Paces

31 07 2014

Putting In Your PacesJim Rohn is one of my favorite self-development teachers.  I’ve been mentored by him over the past few years through his writings and recorded seminars.  I have never met him.  He died in 2009 after a full life.

Some time ago, I heard him dispense this nugget, worthy of wrapping one’s head around:

“Make rest a necessity, not an objective.”

Now that’s a new and powerful way of highlighting the importance of working hard.

Rest is something we earn.  This sounds foreign to American ears.  We are used to the “standard” of a forty-hour work week.  But forty hours of labor over a seven day period—as enough to get ahead–is distinctly Western and recent.  Our grandparents didn’t think like this.

I’ve heard it said that if you’re only working forty hours a week, it’s not likely you’ll get ahead–certainly not as far ahead as your dreams, goals, and ambitions.

Even God worked six days out of seven when He created the cosmos.  He wasn’t done on Friday afternoon at 5:00.

I have family members who are doctors, attorneys, investment bankers, hedge fund managers, Federal officials, and much more.  They’ve all gotten where they’re at the old-fashioned way:  They worked their tails off.  Nobody handed any of them anything.

Here are just a few benefits that will return to you with greater effort and longer hours, as you create a life:

  • You will certainly grow in your chosen fields of vocation and avocation.
  • Your sense of accomplishment will increase as you tackle and master more skills and meet goals.
  • You will run far ahead of the pack simply because many, if not most, are content to put their expected time in, satisfied with “working their forty hours.”
  • Your earning potential will undoubtedly increase, especially if the extra effort is focused and you strive for greater levels of excellence at all to which you put your hands to.

This isn’t a paean of praise to workaholism, far from it.  But in a culture that lives for the weekend, for partying, for good times and leisure, one tends to get an unrealistic picture of what it takes to win at life and realize your full potential.  It’s simply a matter of adjusting your perspective to accord with reality.

So my advice is this:  See work and labor not as a curse, but as a blessing.  Some of the most successful people in recent memory got that way, in sizeable measure, because they love working:  Donald Trump, Gene Simmons, Jack Welch, Bill Gates, and Oprah Winfrey.  Look for lots of increases in many different ways as you likewise work harder toward fulfilling your destiny.

And, when you have striven and exerted and are tired, then rest.

You’ve earned it.

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It “Couldn’t” Be Done?

14 04 2012

It Couldn’t Be Done

Somebody said that it couldn’t be done,
But he with a chuckle replied
That “maybe it couldn’t,” but he would be one
Who wouldn’t say so till he’d tried.

So he buckled right in with the trace of a grin
On his face. If he worried he hid it.
He started to sing as he tackled the thing
That couldn’t be done, and he did it.

Somebody scoffed: “Oh, you’ll never do that;
At least no one ever has done it”;
But he took off his coat and he took off his hat,
And the first thing we knew he’d begun it.

With a lift of his chin and a bit of a grin,
Without any doubting or quiddit,
He started to sing as he tackled the thing
That couldn’t be done, and he did it.

There are thousands to tell you it cannot be done,
There are thousands to prophesy failure;
There are thousands to point out to you, one by one,
The dangers that wait to assail you.

But just buckle in with a bit of a grin,
Just take off your coat and go to it;
Just start to sing as you tackle the thing
That “cannot be done,” and you’ll do it.

–Edgar A. Guest

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Crafting A Life

30 12 2011

I heard a challenge today.  If you invest 3% of your annual earnings into self-development, your earning potential, if acted upon, can increase exponentially.

It hijacked my attention very quickly.

Story was told of a young man, 23, who begin investing 3% of his annual income in materials that would help him improve in his career.  The first year he went from making $20,000.00 to $30,000.00.  While he began investing 3%, after a few years he began investing 10% of his earnings in self-development.  Books, audio/visual materials, seminars, etc.  After 10 years he was making $1,000,000.00.

A million dollars a year.

If you will take the time and develop your skills, your earning potential will increase.  On average, for every hour Americans spend on education and self-development, they spend 50 hours on entertainment in one form or another.  Begin reversing this ratio and you will upend your life for the better.

Here are some tools that will help you craft a career.  And a life too:

Talent Is Overrated: What Really Separates World-Class Performers From Everybody Else (Geoff Colvin) – This book effectively dispels the myth that people like Mozart were born to write music and Tiger Woods to play golf.  Both these luminaries, and others so profiled, got where they were through years of hard work and deliberate practice.

The Success Principles: How To Get From Where You Are To Where You Want to Be (Jack Canfield) – With chapters like “Success Leaves Clues” and “Commit To Constant And Never-Ending Improvement” you won’t go wrong with this read.  Canfield, co-author of the hugely popular Chicken Soup For The Soul series, gets it right every time.  Practical and down-to-earth.

The Magic of Thinking Big (David Schwartz) – A great book.  Dr. Schwartz effectively demonstrates the difference between winners and losers: What one thinks about.  Good thinking will launch you.  Poor thinking will weaken you.

Twelve Pillars (Jim Rohn & Chris Widener) – I read this in an afternoon this past summer.  This is a parable illustrating basic truths, which followed, will improve your career and your life.  Short, but potent.

The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow You (John Maxwell) – An ace on leadership, this book should be in the library of every leader.  Maxwell, who has written countless books on leadership, boils leadership down effectively to 21 principles.  Buy it.  I had the privilege of seeing John speak on the tour that promoted this book in 1999.  Outstanding.  The chapter on “The Law of Influence” alone is worth the price of the book.

Have at it.  2012 is your year.