Putting In Your Time and Paces

31 07 2014

Putting In Your PacesJim Rohn is one of my favorite self-development teachers.  I’ve been mentored by him over the past few years through his writings and recorded seminars.  I have never met him.  He died in 2009 after a full life.

Some time ago, I heard him dispense this nugget, worthy of wrapping one’s head around:

“Make rest a necessity, not an objective.”

Now that’s a new and powerful way of highlighting the importance of working hard.

Rest is something we earn.  This sounds foreign to American ears.  We are used to the “standard” of a forty-hour work week.  But forty hours of labor over a seven day period—as enough to get ahead–is distinctly Western and recent.  Our grandparents didn’t think like this.

I’ve heard it said that if you’re only working forty hours a week, it’s not likely you’ll get ahead–certainly not as far ahead as your dreams, goals, and ambitions.

Even God worked six days out of seven when He created the cosmos.  He wasn’t done on Friday afternoon at 5:00.

I have family members who are doctors, attorneys, investment bankers, hedge fund managers, Federal officials, and much more.  They’ve all gotten where they’re at the old-fashioned way:  They worked their tails off.  Nobody handed any of them anything.

Here are just a few benefits that will return to you with greater effort and longer hours, as you create a life:

  • You will certainly grow in your chosen fields of vocation and avocation.
  • Your sense of accomplishment will increase as you tackle and master more skills and meet goals.
  • You will run far ahead of the pack simply because many, if not most, are content to put their expected time in, satisfied with “working their forty hours.”
  • Your earning potential will undoubtedly increase, especially if the extra effort is focused and you strive for greater levels of excellence at all to which you put your hands to.

This isn’t a paean of praise to workaholism, far from it.  But in a culture that lives for the weekend, for partying, for good times and leisure, one tends to get an unrealistic picture of what it takes to win at life and realize your full potential.  It’s simply a matter of adjusting your perspective to accord with reality.

So my advice is this:  See work and labor not as a curse, but as a blessing.  Some of the most successful people in recent memory got that way, in sizeable measure, because they love working:  Donald Trump, Gene Simmons, Jack Welch, Bill Gates, and Oprah Winfrey.  Look for lots of increases in many different ways as you likewise work harder toward fulfilling your destiny.

And, when you have striven and exerted and are tired, then rest.

You’ve earned it.

Image Credit





Why Servant Leadership Carries the Day

7 09 2013

servant-leadership1

“Servant-leadership is more than a concept; it is a fact. Any great leader, by which I also mean an ethical leader of any group, will see herself or himself as a servant of that group and will act accordingly.” (M. Scott Peck)

Today, let’s look at the concept of servant leadership.  This particular approach to leading people has become popular and valued in recent years.  Our discussion will highlight why servant leaders are most effective.  In short, a servant leader rules—in the healthiest sense of that verb.   There are sound reasons why.

To properly care for those with whom we’ve been entrusted is a sacred responsibility.  Lives are either ennobled or disgusted, even scandalized, by the exercise and example of leaders both good and bad.

At the core, a real leader must come to understand this value if he’s to succeed at all:  It’s not about you; it’s about them. Former General Electric CEO, Jack Welch–voted Manager of the [20th] Century in 1999 by Fortune–said this:

“The day you become a leader is the day it becomes about them, not you. It is your responsibility to develop your team.”

What are some qualities that set apart the servant leader and make him or her more effective than all others?

  • Servant leaders recognize the full dignity of the human person.  Those under our leadership are human beings, made in the image of God.  They are not chattel, a commodity to serve our self-interest.  They have feelings and aspirations.  Dreams.  They have a story.  They are not tin soldiers to be moved by our whims.
  • Servant leaders recognize that leadership is first modeled, rather than mandated.  We must first exemplify excellence in the way we conduct our lives.  There is nothing more contemptible for a soldier than having someone issue directives without climbing into the trenches.  Posers are quickly found out.
  • Servant leaders, though ultimately responsible to steer the ship, take into account the consequences of their decisions.  In the home, a wise husband listens to the input of his wife and his children.  And he does so with the kind of humility that is aware that he doesn’t have all knowledge and all perspective.  We all have blind spots.  Servant leaders understand that and weigh all immediately possible courses.  “First do no harm” is the chief maxim for the medical profession.  It is the same for servant leaders.

Are you a servant to those for whom you’ve been given responsibility?  Can you take steps away from your own ego and insecurity to put their interests ahead of your own?

Go ahead and do it.  You’ll be amazed at the results.

Image Credit





“You Can’t Outsmart the Work”

25 08 2013

You Cant Outsmart the WorkJim Rohn is one of my favorite self-development teachers.  I’ve been mentored by him over the past few years through his writings and recorded seminars.  I have never met him.  He died in 2009 after a full life.

Some time ago, I heard him dispense this nugget, worthy of wrapping one’s head around:

“Make rest a necessity, not an objective.”

Now that’s a new and powerful way of highlighting the importance of working hard.

Rest is something we earn.  This sounds foreign to American ears.  We are used to the “standard” of a forty-hour work week.  But forty hours of labor over a seven day period—as enough to get ahead–is distinctly Western and recent.  Our grandparents didn’t think like this.

I’ve heard it said that if you’re only working forty hours a week, it’s not likely you’ll get ahead–certainly not as far ahead as your dreams, goals, and ambitions.

Even God worked six days out of seven when He created the cosmos.  He wasn’t done on Friday afternoon at 5:00.

I have family members who are doctors, attorneys, investment bankers, hedge fund managers, Federal officials, and much more.  They’ve all gotten where they’re at the old-fashioned way:  They worked their tails off.  Nobody handed any of them anything.

Here are just a few benefits that will return to you with greater effort and longer hours, as you create a life:

  • You will certainly grow in your chosen fields of vocation and avocation.
  • Your sense of accomplishment will increase as you tackle and master more skills and meet goals.
  • You will run far ahead of the pack simply because many, if not most, are content to put their expected time in, satisfied with “working their forty hours.”
  • Your earning potential will undoubtedly increase, especially if the extra effort is focused and you strive for greater levels of excellence at all to which you put your hands to.

This isn’t a paean of praise to workaholism, far from it.  But in a culture that lives for the weekend, for partying, for good times and leisure, one tends to get an unrealistic picture of what it takes to win at life and realize your full potential.  It’s simply a matter of adjusting your perspective to accord with reality.

So my advice is this:  See work and labor not as a curse, but as a blessing.  Some of the most successful people in recent memory got that way, in sizeable measure, because they love working:  Donald Trump, Gene Simmons, Jack Welch, Bill Gates, and Oprah Winfrey.  Look for lots of increases in many different ways as you likewise work harder toward fulfilling your destiny.

And, when you have striven and exerted and are tired, then rest.

You’ve earned it.

Image Credit